HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
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SIR SAMUEL WHITE BAKER
CYPRUS AS I SAW IT IN 1879
page 145

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8 CYPRUS IN 1879. I2 cultivated fields or in the wild prickly low plants upoj the open ground which have been misnamed heath The habits of this bird have nothing in common wi those of the red-legged partridge, as it is never fotA upon the bare rocky hill-sides, which are the generi resort of the latter annoying species, and although t scrub bush may contain both, there is a markei difference in their character. Th e red-lëg is a defc mined runner, and therefore a bad game bird for t shooter, as it will run ahead when first disturbed an) rise far beyond shot range, instead of squatting li' the grey partridge and permitting a sporting sh The francolin is never found upon the bare hill-sid neither is it a runner in the open, although it w: occasionally trouble the dogs in the bush by refusin to rise until they have followed it for some distan precisely as pheasants will run in covert until halt by the " stops " or by a net. I am not sure of t power of resistance to cold possessed by the francolini as they are seldom met with upon the higher mountai in Cyprus, but are generally found upon the inferio: altitudes and low grounds : still the hazel-huhn Austria is a species of francolin which resists t intense cold of a central-European winter. Only one march remained to the extreme eastern limit of Cyprus, Cape St. Andrea, distant fourteeT η miles. The country was exactly similar to that which we had recently passed through, and although alike, it could hardly be called monotonous, as the eye was never fatigued. The few inhabitants were poor to the last degree ; the dwellings were mere hovels. We passed deep holes in the ground, the sides of which were baked by fire, so as to resemble earthen jars about ten feet deep and seven in diameter, with a

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