HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
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SIR SAMUEL WHITE BAKER
CYPRUS AS I SAW IT IN 1879
page 157

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following morning upon our return journey, and after j a lovely march of twenty miles, partly along anj elevated plateau which commanded a view of both seasi north and south, and then descending some 700 or 800{ feet by a steep and interesting pass, we arrived atl Lithrankomi, after passing through GallibornQ. T o my astonishment the oxen and their drivers, I instead of awaiting me at Lithrankomi, were still at the latter village, and hearing that we had passed through, 1 they came on to join us, but only arrived some hours 1 later, at nightfall. I discharged my camels that even-J ing, as the carts would begin their new contract on the following morning. I rose early on the next day, as we had a long march 1 of twenty-two miles before us to Trichomo ; but as the oxen had been resting for many days, and I had been y paying highly for their food while they had been doings nothing, I knew they must be in first-rate condition, l| and in spite of bad roads they would accomplish the ' distance. There was always a difficulty in inducing the carters to start early, but this morning there was a greater delay than usual, and I myself went to superintend the loading of the carts. I could hardly believe my eyes ! In Georgi's cart the oxen bad been yoked. There was a black creature about ' half a foot shorter than its fellow, and composed of skin and bones. The horns of this animal were antiquities : a drawn appearance about the head and face, and deeply sunken eyes, denoted extreme age. The fellow ox I recognised after some time as our old friend ini reduced circumstances ; it had been going through a course of wild artichokes and prickly thistles since I had seen it last, which had brought it into racing con-| dition by the loss of at least a hundredweight of flesh J

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