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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 56

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ZA M BERTI. N. IJE H Γ EX. SI Ν. LB HUEN. Concerning Nicole Hue», a Carmelite of Pont Audemer, and his work I can learn nothing but wliat may be gleaned from (1) the imprint ou his last page (.the book has no title) which runs thus: "Den sainctes peregrinations et des avirons et des lieux prochains. Du mont de synay et la glorieuse Iratherine : cest ouvraijè et petit livre contenant du tout la description ainsi que dieu a voulu le donner a eongnoistre. Imprime a Lyon par honnestes hommes Michalet topic de pyrmont: et Jaeques heremberch dalemaigue deinouraut audit lyon. Lan de nostre seigneur mille ecce quatrevigtz et huietz et le XXVIII de Novembre." And (2) a note inserted in the Grenville eopy, Britisli Museum, G. 7203 : " Breydenbach, traduit par N. Huen, fol. Lyon, 1488. La Croix dû Maine il. p. 190, together witli Du Verdier m. 143 and I'inelo. Bib. Qeog. p. 1468, or Rechardcrie iv. 402. liave all considered N. Huen as an original traveller, but Panzer ι. 538. together with .La Valliere ni. 30, and Crevenna rv. 20 very tmly concur in describing Huen as giving only a translation of Breydenbach (Bernhard von Breitenbach, Perqgrimtiût, fol. Mainz, I486), though not a literal one. This edition is most extremely rare, and sold at the Roxburgh sale, No. 7259. for £84. It is the first French book with copper-plates." Cyprus is an island, a kingdom, a country, thns named from a chief city so named, which was formerly called Paphon, and is dedicated to Venus. In time past it had great renown for its metal, and abounded in bronze, the use of which was there first discovered. A land producing many wines, surrounded entirely by the sea: bnt in the interior it has had noble cities, great and rich, situated in all directions. The chief and capital is called Nicossia, in this there are fine ehnrehe*. The cathedral is magnificent: there are parish churches with mendicant friars. Our Carmelite house is near the king's palace, and was founded by the lords of France, for you can see a proof in the church, by the arms of the king of Jerusalem, of the king of France, of the duke of Normandy. They are also inside the great episcopal church. Near our convent rests the body of S. Jean de Monntfort quite entire: it is the most beautiful corpse which was ever seen on the earth. In devotion and with eagerness tho people go there to seek for health. Near there, quite seven miles away, is the body of R. Memer, from which flows an oil of mneh virtne. At the extremity of the island in that direction was a city formerly very fanions, as is shown by its ruins, called Baffa. There is bad air there, as in all the island. Very noble were its churches in time past, as yon see them in their ruin. Below the chnrch which belonged to the Friars Minor is a prison where H. Paul was bound and kept for some time with S. Barnabas while preaching the Gospel, and seven pits hard by in another church where were the seven sleepers. And a spring of water of mnch virtue which is carried afar to eure fevers. The city called Famagnsta was likewise strong and powerful; Costns, the father of S. Latharine (sic) was king there, and it was called Famacosti. Limesson is another city where there were fine chnrches. The bishop still lives there with two canons. Besides there is Salines, which was called Piscopia, or rather Cyprus, from which the island took its name, and now there is no house except the chnrch of S. Ladze, ill equipped, and a single begnde. The cause of this destruction arose from the sister of the king of England who was going for devotion's sake to Jerusalem. The king of Cyprus took her and dishonoured her, which thing wrought ill for him and all the country which came to help her and destroyed everything with fire and sword. The soil is fertile, and rich in good things, fine plains, mountains and forests which hold wild animals, and great plenty, so that you may have twelve sheep for a ducat. It is 175 miles in length and 125 miles broad: 300 miles distant from Rhodes. It is to-day under the Venetians, and they are in danger of losing it in no long time, for the soldiers

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