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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 113

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being shot by a musket in the head, all the rest, who through hopes in him, had with much difficulty, and upon great disadvantage, disputed the businesse as yet, quitted the defence uf the walls and ranne every one to their uwn houses, hoping to provide for their wives safety. So as though Pietro Pisani, a counsellor, and Bernardino Polani came quickly thither, they in vain used their authority and example tu stay the people, who were already in disorder and much confusion; amongst which, whilst Polani inixt hiiuselfe, and did by force slay some of them, he together with thein was cnt in pieces. Bnt Pisani retreated with the rest tu the Piazza, whither people came from all parts to save themselves, and were not as yet pursued by the Turks; fur minding onely the making of themselves masters of the walls, after they had driven the first from the bulwork Cunstanzo, they went presently to the other bnlworks, where the enemy were valiantly fought with, but especially by the Italian foot. But in fine finding their inworks lost and that they were at the same time fought with, both before and behind, not being able to make any lotfger resistance, they quitted the walls, and betook themselves all to make good the Piazza, which they did for a while against the assailants, till the Bashaw of Aleppo came in, who entring the town by the bulwork Tripoli, hasted first abont the walls, killing many that were tarried behind; though throwing down their amis, they in vain indeavoured pardon. And baring routed some armed companies upon the bmVork Barbaro, who had been got together by Jo vanni Paliero a noble Venetian, and one that being but a private merchant in the City, had upon severall occasions given good testimony uf his valour ; and meeting with nothing to withstand him any where else, he came to the Piazza, where finding so many in arms, as they made stont resistance : he presently made three pieces of artillery be brought from off the walls, wherewith he dis-ordered, aud sorely indniuniaged those squadrons which defended the Piazza, aud forced them ut forsake it, many of them withdrawing themselves into the courts of the palace, whither the lieutenant, the bishop Contarmi, and divers others of the chicfe of the City, were first come. And those tliat conld nut get in, being scattered up and down, and not having any defence, were either slain, or taken prisoners : bnt soon after, he made sign of parle}' tu those that were within the court, and sent to the lieutenant a certain Cyprian fryer, tu treat with him, who having yielded a little before, was received npon his parole. This man having in the Bashaw's name promis'd life unto them all, was immediately sent back with Tutio Costanza, who in the lientenant's name said they wonld surrender. By whose order they having all forthwith laid down their arms, it fell miserably out, that at the opening of the gates the Turks, who were thronging round about, entred violently into the court, and cruelly put all those nnanned people to the sword : wherein the lieutenant, the bishop, and all the other eminent personages, ranne the same fortune as did the souldiers, and the meanest men. After which, the Turks ran without any order or discipline all over the City, plundering the houses, destroying the churches, dishonouring matrons, violating virgins, and putting all to the sword, without any distinction either of sex, age, or condition. So as the Turks slew that day above 20,000 persons; and those whose lives were spared by the cruel 1 enemy, rather for their greater punishment, than out of any charity, were tyed iu chains, dragM over the dead caricasse» of their parents and friends, and carried away prisoners. Thus that City, which for many years had lived in great pomp and splendour, and in great abundance of all things, did in one day undergo all the extreams of calamity; affording by this so horrible spectacle a new example of variety of humane affairs. This sacking hapened on the ninth of September, the fourteenth day after the Turkish army was incauip'd before the City. The booty which was exported by the enemy and sent to Constantinople, to be presented to the grand Signor, aud to the Bashaws, was very great and rich; yet did they not go away PAKUTA. io;

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