HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
uses Google technology and indexes only and selectively internet - libraries having books with free public access
 
  Previous Next  

CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 139

View PDF version of this page

The other ordinary captains of the Stradiots, with one hundred horses, went to Famagosta. Meanwhile some of onr Cypriote went off with their vessels and scoured the seas of Caramania and Syria in pirate fashion, taking some prizes. But rumours of war readied them from Syria and other Turkish lands, and they made for home, bringing over some of onr monks and priests, who advised us of the immense preparations which the Turks were making for the war against Cyprus. At the end of March the Pasha sent forth from Constantinople Mnrad Bais, with twenty-five galleys bound for Rhodes, to cut off help designed for Cyprus. On April 17 Piali Pasha left Constantinople with eight galleys and thirty galliots. When Cnbat Chawnsh returned from Venice bearing a more spiriteli reply than hail been anticipateli, twelve chawnshes were at once sent to isolate the Bailo of Venice and his staff, a chawnsh and some janissaries being left on guard to prevent news of any kind reaching him, and to cut him off from all intercourse, consultation and conversation. Then with all possible diligence they hastened tho despatch of the rest of the fleet, and on March 16,1570, AH Pasha sailed with thirty-six galleys, twelve flats, four Tnrkish vessels and two Venetian, the galleon of Mehmed Pasha, eight lighters, forty horseooats and many caratmtemli, full of men, provisions, guns, ammunition and other necessary stores, for the conquest of Cyprus. General Mustafa Pasha commanded the whole force. Piali Pasha had left before, and at Tcnos, a little island belonging to the Venetians, slew many Christians: on March 28 he took Negropont, and bailed with provisions left for Rhodes. He caught up the rest of the fleet on the way ; with great rejoicing they united their forces, and arrived June 1 at Rhodes. From Rhodes they went to Finica, whither the army had been sent overland, this being a port of Anatolia, near Cyprus and convenient for crossing thither. About Jnne 20 they sent six galliots to Cyprus to get news : they reached a village called Lara, near Alexandretta, and while their crews were chasing some herdsmen twenty-nine of onr Stradiot horse fell upon them, and drove them on board, killing a good many Turks. Not one Christian fell, only the horse of the lieutenant of these Stradiots, who, hoping to get some reward for his gallant exploit, came to Nicosia with a nnmber of prisoners and many heads. The magnifi-cent Dandolo showed his liberality by refusing him even an advance of pay to bny another horse for the service of S. Mark. . Meanwhile the right reverend bishop Contarmi made an oration in the vnlgar tongue in S. Sophia, urging every man to be loyal and strenuous in the struggle ; holding ont to them the warm and grateful affection which the Republic bore to Cyprus, with such warm and graceful eloquence and strong persuasiveness that all were moved to tears of enthusiasm, and each man resolved to die in defence of his plighted word, his country and his kin. When he came down from the pulpit he was embraced affectionately by the high officials, the counts, barons and knights, and warmly thanked. Then Count Giacomo, in the name of all the Cypriote, addressed the bishop and tie officials—"All Venice knows, and everyone can see, onr loyalty, devotion and obedience to the Republic, a fidelity of so long standing. Everyone shall know again at this crisis, in these perils which beset us, by onr brilliant deeds, by onr very blood, how loyal we are; how we woiild rather die by the edge of the sword than change onr masters." They were active in carrying provisions into the fortresses, and the high officials went to Aschia, to meet the general commanding at Famagosta, and to arrange al»ut grain, cattle and other matters necessary for such an undertaking. For all they could do an immense quantity of wheat and barley remained outside, while they took possession of the larger part of onr cattle, both small and great. 17—2 CALEPIO. 131

View PDF version of this page


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 
Our banners   Bibliography   Global Folio
All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated.
If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate Cyprus Explorer as a source and place link to us.
Created at June 2008
              Яндекс.Метрика