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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 196

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the Friars of onr company and also the Lay-men, gave each of us eight lires of Venice to the gnardian of the monastery, and one lire to the Frier that attended us, in the name of gifts or almes, but indeed for three days lodging and dyet. Upon Friday the twentith foure uf May, we seven consorts (namely, two Franciscan Friers, one Erimi tane Frier, and two Lay men, all Frenchmen, and my selfe and my brother) hired a boat in the Hauen for foure lires of Venice, to carric us to the Cyprian Barke we had hired, and we carried with ns our food, a cheese costing fouie Aspers, a jarre of Oyle costing sixe Aspers, and a vessell of wine (called Cuso, somewhat bigger than an English barrel I, and full of rich wine, but such as fretted our very intrals) costing one zechine, and foure soldi of Venice, and two Turkish aspers; and egges costing twenty three aspers, beside bisket which we brought ont of the Greeke ship. In twilight (for the nights use not here to be darke) we set saile, and were forced to goe backe towards the West, along the shoare of Cyprus, to the promontory called Capo di Gatti, that is, the Cape of Cats, that we might from thence (according to the Marriners experience) fetch a faire winde. So we sailed that evening thirtie miles (of Italy I meane) and the next day twentie mi los to a village of Cyprus called Lemissu (where Christians ships use to put in.) Here we cast anchor, & all the six and twentie day of May expected a winde, which we got at midnight following. Part III, Bookc 3, Page 122. Cyprus is an iland in the same sea, and it is most fertile, ycelding canes of honey, whence sugar is made, and rich wines, and abounding with many things required for life and for pleasure, and this island the Turks in the last age took from the Venetians by force of armes, the chief cities whereof are Famagosta and Nicosia. Part III, Booke 3, Page 125. Lastly in Palestine, Cyprus and those parts, partly I understood by others, partly 1 found by experience, that it seldome raines, and that about September & October onely, and not often at that time, but so violently for the time, as if it would beate down the very houses, falling (as it were) by palefulls at once, and that the fields are watred with night dewes, at the fall whereof no man stires ont of dores, but with his head well covered, for danger of sicknesse, all men using to keepe in the house till the dew dried, while in the meantime by day the beate is so excessive, as a man can hardly induré, his apparrell, though it be of linneu or silke, if it hang not loose but be close about him. 1KÜ EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

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