HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
uses Google technology and indexes only and selectively internet - libraries having books with free public access
 
  Previous Next  

CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 212

View PDF version of this page

LITHGOW. William Lithgow (1582—1645. See Diet, of ΛΌί. Biography, xxxm. 339) published in crown 4to, London, 1632, The total Discourse of the Rare adventures, and painefuU Peregrinations of long nineteen years Travaites etc. His visit to Cyprus fell between 1609 and 1621. He reckons his "goings, traversings aud returuiugs " at thirty-six thousand and odd miles. I transcribe from pp. 182—189 of the edition of 1640. A twelfth issue appeared at Leith, 1814. Twelve clays I was between Rhodes and Limisso in Cyprus, where arrived Ϊ received more gracious demonstrations from the Islanders, than I could hope for, or wish, being far beyond my merit or expectation ; onely contenting my curiosity with a quick minde, 1 redounded thanks for my imbraeed courtesies. The people are generally streng and nimble, of great civility, hospitality tn their neighbours, and exceedingly affectionated to strangers. The second day after my arrivali, I took with me an interpreter, and went to see Nicosia, which is placed in the midst of the kingdom. Bnt in my journey thither extreain was the heat aud thirst I endured; both in respect of the season, and also want of water: and although I had with me snffieiencie of wine, yet durst I drink none thereof, being so strong, and withall had a toste of pitch; and that is because they have no barrels, bnt great jars made of earth, wherein their wine is put. And these jars are all inclosed within the ground save onely their monthes, which stand always open like to a source or cistern, whose insides are all interlarded with pitch to preserve the earthen vessels tmbroke asunder, in regard of the forcible wine; yet making the taste thereof unpleasant to liquorons lips; and turneth the wine, too heady for the brain in digestion, which for health groweth difficult for strangers, and to themselves a swallowing np of diseases. To cherish life and blood, the health of man. Give me a Toast, phing'd in a double kan. And spie'd with ginger: for the wrestling grape, ilakcs man become from man a sottish ape. Nicosia is the principal city of Cyprns, and is invironed with mountains, like unto Florence in ^Etrnria; wherein the Beglerbeg remaineth; the second is Famagusta, the chief strength and sea-port in it : S elina, Lemisso, Paphos, and Fontana Morosa, are the other fonr speciali towns in the island. This isle of Cyprns was of old called Achametide, A matusa, and by some Marena ra, that is happy. It is of length extending from East to West, 210, large 60, and of circuit 600 miles. It yieldeth infinite canes of Sugar, Cotton-wooll, Oile, Honey, Comes, Turpentine, Allom, Verdegreeee, Grograms, store of Metals and Salt; besides all other sorts of fruit and commodities in abundance. It was also called Cerastis, because it butted towards the East with one horn, and lastly Cyprus, from the abundance of Cypresse trees there growing. This island was consecrated to Venns, where in Paphos she was greatly honoured, termed hence, Dea Cypri. Festa dies Veneris tota celeberrima Cypro Venerat, ipsa suis aderat Venus aurea festis. Venus feast day through Cyprus hallowed came, Whose feasts lier presence dignified the same. 202 EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

View PDF version of this page


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 
Our banners   Bibliography   Global Folio
All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated.
If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate Cyprus Explorer as a source and place link to us.
Created at June 2008
              Яндекс.Метрика