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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 265

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orders to the lunleteer not to go any further with me, and that they should not permit any Franks to come into the city, on which 1 sent the janizari with the letter to the Governor, who was very satisfied, aud said he should be glad tu see me. Tho city of Fainagusta is about two miles in ciremnference, ami well fortified by the Venetians', it is of an oblong square figure; the bastions are all semicircular; on the west side of the town, a rising ground runs along from north to south, on which they took the advantage to build the rampart, which makes it exceedingly strong this way, a fossee being cut into the rock on the three sides to the land ; and in that to the west there are covered ways to sally out. This high ground, which is tho strength uf the west side, exposed the south part of the town to the enemy, for it was from this part that the Turkish general battered the south gate, which is the only entrance from the land ; nnd it is probable, that freni the high gronnd on the north side they planteil their batteries against the north east comer to the sen, where there is a strong castle also fortified within. There is a gate freni the city to the port, which is well sheltered byseveral rocks, and the entrance to it, which is at the north east corner, is defended by a chain drawn across to the castle ; it was here that the stuffed skin of the brave unfortunate Bragatline was hung up at the yard of a galley, after he had been most inhumanly flny'd alive by the treacherous Turks, against whom he had bravely defended the city. I observed on the ramparts the names of several uf the Venetian Governors-of Cyprus; and near the gate there are two statues of lyons, one of which is very large, they were probably set up on some pillars in the principal parts of the city after the Venetian manner. The antient piazza seems tu have been very beautiful ; the house of the Governor with a portico before it, is on one side, aud the western front of the church of saint Sophia on the other; it is a most beautiful Gothic building, now converted into a mosque, but. about three years ago two thirds uf it was thrown down by an earthquake, together with the greatest part of tho city. Before it there is a Greek inscription on a black stone, which might be part of a pedestal for a statue: near the north west corner of the chnrch there are two pillars, which probably had on thein the Venetian ensigns; near these is a coffin of white marble adorned with lyons heads, aud festoons held by cupids. It is surprising to see what a great number uf churches there are in tins city ; St George's, one of the most magnificent, was thrown down by the earthquake; another large one, which, if 1 mistake not, was dedicated to saint Catherine, is now the principal mosque. There is very little trade at the place, which is the reason why all provisions are cheap here, the price of a fat sheep being only half a crown. No Christian is suffered to live within the walls, unless it be in eon finement, in which condition I saw a Greek patriarch of Constantinople, who being deposed, and intriguing in order to supplant his successor, was banished to this place a few months before; 1 saw him afterwards in one of the Princes Islande near Constantinople returned from banishment. They will not suffer a Christian tu go iu or ont of the city, otherwise than on foot; and a European having obtained a firman from the Grand Signor to enter the city iu his chaise, when he sent it to the Governor, received this answer in a very eool manner: "That in obedience to the finnan he might enter in his carriage, but that he would not permit him to go out of the city in it." The present buildings do not take up above half the space within the walls, and a great part even of those are not inhabited. They have very good water brought three or four miles by an aqueduct, whieh is carried for the most part in a channel on the gronnd. Between the two chains of mountains that stretch along the island, there is a large plain seven or eight miles wide, and between thirty and forty long, beginning about Fama gusta; as it is one of the best parts of Cyprus, aud must secure from the privateers, so it is chiefly POCOCKE.

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