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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 289

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DU UM M 0X1). 270 Sipahi, horsemen, to the number of 3;000, who are paid from the tythos of the grain, and other produce of the island; but they purchase their sipaliiliqs or lands from the Muhassil, and these lands are for life. Yenicheri Aghasi, lieutenant general of the Janizaries or foot soldiers. Qolkîayasi, lieutenants of the foot soldiers. Chorbaji, captains of foot, to the number of 18, who are paid out of the villages. Yenicheri, infantry, to the number of 1,000, who have no clothing or regular pay, but subsist upon the produce of certain villages assigned to them, the rents of the customs, the salt lakes A.c. Sirdar, high marshal. Dtsdar or Qale Aghasi, governor of the castle. The kingdom of Cyprus, ever since its subjection to the Turks, has been divided into sixteen districts, which derive their names from the most considerable towns or villages in the respective divisions :—Such as Lamica, Limesol, Piscopi, Ghilan, Afdimo, Cuclia, Crnsocka, Baffo, Lefka, Morfn, and Peuloia, Cerigna, Famagosta, Mossaria, Citrea, Orini, and Carpasso. Anybody will at once perceive that these are not the names used by the ancient Grecians, but rather formod by the modern Greeks upon the Italian : but as I have neither ancient geographer or chart, I cannot favour yon with the old names; for such is the ignorance of every living denture in the island, that they have never heard of Amathus or Urania, or indeed of any circumstance of antiquity : even a bishop scarce knows any other book than Iiis Bible and Ritual, which perhaps he can read, though without understanding more of them than does the mule he rides. None of these towns and districts have any other officers or magistrates than a Qazi, or judge ordinary, excepting Lamica, Famagosta, Cerigna, and Baffo, which are provided with an Alai Bey, or general of horse; Sirdar, or Marshal; Disdar, governor of the castle; Dideban, governor of the islands, Yicu-inspector, and a Gumvukji, or customer. When any cause of importance falls under the inspection of the Qazi, he gives an 'ilam or report upon it to the Musalim, who after having considered the circumstances passes a decree; bnt both the report and decree depend on the offering, and not upon the merits of the cause. No lawyer is retained, no time fixed for hearing and determining suits, and no place set apart for a Court of justice. The divan of the Qazi's house is the bench, and every man is his own attorney. In this kingdom is one archbishop with three suffragans; he resides at Nicosia, and his see is composed of the districts of Famagosta, Messaria, Citria, Orini, and Carpasso. The bishop of Baffo lives in the town of that name, which together with Piseope, Afdimo, Cnclia, and Crnsocka or Crisofu, is in his diocese. The bishop of Chitty is sometimes in Lamica, sometimes in Limesol, which two places and Ghilan are in his bishopric. The bishop of Cerigna lives in that town, his see comprehending besides Lefca, Morfn and Penloia. Our bishop joins me in the opinion that Chitty is really the ancient Citinni, or very near the place where that city stood ; it appears to have been very extensive by the old foundations that are daily dug up all round. In ranging about I found two or three places from whence they dug stones, and as they were below ground my curiosity induced me to peep into them. There I found well squared stones of a prodigious size neatly laid in good cement: the stupid labourers prop the roofs with pillars while they nndermine the building; whereas, with the hundredth part of the time, toil and expence, they might have accomplished their aim by uncovering the whole, and clearing away six or eight feet of earth and rubbish. The wall I traced a considerable way and found it of great breadth; though the labourers had wrought in such an irregular manner that I could not measure it : from general appearances however I am

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