HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 449

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blackberry bushes : our road sometimes lay along the top of these mountains on roads overhanging tremendous precipices, whose abrupt fall was softened by the trees growing out of their sides, and sometimes along the banks of the stream below, whose murmuring was an agreeable accompaniment to the beauty of the prospect. Many burnt trees were lying along the mountains and across the valleys, of which the peasants make great quantities of charcoal, and this forms a considerable branch of commerce between Cyprus and Alexandria. At a quarter past ten we stopped under a large plane tree by the side of the stream, where we dined, and repaired our last night's bad rest by a two hours' sleep. At half past twelve we set forward again, not fearing the sun, as our road was completely shaded and frequently darkened by the copiousness of the foliage around it. At two o'clock we came to a part of the mountains which was cultivated, where we found superlatives wanting to express our admiration. The whole valley and the rise of the mountains, covered with rich reddish mould, were everywhere crowded with vines, mulberries, olives, figs, planes, oaks, brushwood and fern. This continued for the rest of to-day's journey, and a considerable quantity of wine is made here. The villages in the neighbourhood (except Levka, all we saw to-day) were Morgon, Xakithira, and Am peli. These (though small, yet all built of stone) formed a pratty addition to the scenery, whether perched on the top of the mountains, or half hid by foliage ab the bottom of the valley. The inhabitants were all black with the juice of grapes, which they were washing in the stream below. At half past four we saw the bay of Levka behind us : for the last hour we rode along the tops of high mountains on roads that overhung tremendous precipices, whose pine-clothed rock formed a magnificent contrast with the luxuriant cultivation of the valley below. At five we stopped at the convent, dedicated to the Virgin, of Kikkos, the largest in Cyprus, It is built, though irregnlarly, after the European fashion, aud being on the top of a height, commands a superb view that extends on a clear day to the coast of Cara mania. It is built of stone, but we found carpenters at work in it, all the interior having been burnt two years ago, when a considerable number of manuscripts which it contained were all lost. It is manned by above two hundred priests and ealoyers, but as it possesses a great number of farms throughout the island, particularly an extensive one near Nicosia, these are distributed among them, and there were now not above sixty at Kikkos. Here we were very hospitably received, and supped and slept well. There were a number of cottages round the convent, which I took for a village, but was told they were a farm belonging to the convent. λΥβ saw in the mountains to-day a great many large spreading trees, with red bark and a broad leaf, called by the natives antrnuklia (arbutus andrachne). Qetober 20. Thenn. 84e. At seven we left Kikkos, and for five hours passed over and between very high mountains, adorned with the same natural productions as those of yesterday, the rocks still bearing a strong appearance of being volcanick, but with less cultivation. Among these mountains we saw three villages, Melikhori, Treiselees, and levrekon. One of these consisted of three houses, and another of five. At half past twelve we descended into a beautiful part of the valley, through which ran a crystal stream, shaded by all the trees named before, whose verdure was a delightful contrast to the grey rock hanging over it. Here we found a small farm belonging to Kikkos, inhabited by six or seven priests, provided with a good corn-mill turned by the mountain-stream, and with a large garden plentifully stocked with olives, figs, pomegranates, mulberries and vines, from which the ealoyers made silk, oil and wine. Here we made a tolerable dinner, and rested two hours, which we should not have done had not our guide deceived us as to its distance freni Paphos, in the hope (as we paid him by the day) that he should prevent us arriving there TURNER. 439

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