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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 463

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ΧΟΤΙΖΙΕ. TOCQUEVILLE Mahonuuedan rite, or overwhelmed by the terror, savagery and exactions which have left thein but half alive? Tu so many misfortunes must be added as the crown that for many years the people cannot remember so rich a harvest of all kinds as this year : but by reason of these appalling events not one of the inhabitants has been able tu enjoy it, or turn it to account. In fact no merchant is found willing to buy produce, even at the lowest prices: and you can purchase a big goat at two francs, a chilo of wheat at a franc and a half, and a chilo of barley at a frane, and so in proportion every article of food. The merchants having entrusted their wares and money to landowners who have been murdered, or pauperised by the load of taxes, or who have been stripped of their property, or are fled, are driven to bankruptcy. All the Greek churches and monasteries which were rich iu money, gifts, aids, and stores of sacred vessels are now utterly bare, just as the fields are laid waste, agriculture entirely ruined, and all kind of trade aud business stopped. It seems then that the Governor lias vowed the destruction aud extermination of the whole nation. Already the families of the Consuls of France, Naples, Russia and others, are embarked fur Europe; and those of other Europeans of means, who were living here, are preparing to do the same. Only the Consuls now remain to attend to their diplomatic duties. A Neapolitan vessel bound for Leghorn has already left Cyprus, full of Greek and Frank families. Other vessels, French, Sardinian and Austrian, are being hired to transport the remaining European households, and those Greeks who can effect an escape in disguise. The island will then remain a den of wild beasts, rather than an abode of men. POUQUKVILLE. Monsieur F. C. H. PonqneviUe published in 4 vols. 8vo, Paris, 1834, bis Histoire de lu Régénération de la Grèce, comprenant le précis des événements depuis 1740 jusqu'en 1824. The author was French Consul General at the Court of Ali Pasha at Janina, and gives a lively and incorrect account of the exploits and death of that able and unscrupulous Viceroy. An ardent Fhilliellene he snaps up any tale which he thinks would illustrate the savagery of the Turks, the chivalry of the French, and the perfidy of England. What he bas to say about the fortunes of Cyprus is neither long nor exact t" Pouqneville is always ont"—Byron, Xotes on Cltihle Harold, n. 17), but the book is too often quoted to be neglected here. There is a Romaic version by X. D. Zygoura. The remains of the prelates and other leading citizens executed in Nicosia on July 21, 22,1821, were collected and interred within the precincts of the Phaneromene Church. When the church was restored and enlarged in 1872—8, they were removed to their present resting-place under the floor of the Sacrarium, just in front of a wall tablet in the sonth apse. The names thereon recorded are Cyprianos, Archbishop, Chrysantlios, Bishop of Paphos, Meletios, of Kition. Laurentius, of Kyreneia, Meleti», Archdeacon, G. Masouras, P. Oeconomides, M. Glykys, P. Pierakes, I. Antonopoulos, E. Boskos, X. Zographos, S. Solomides, S. Symeopoulos, Christodoulos Kourtellares, Joseph, abbot of Kykkos. Cyprus had suffered towards the end of May, 1821, some fatal shocks, bnt its inhabitants, as soft as the names of Idalion, Paphos and Amathus, and well enough satisfied with their condition, had disarmed the suspicions of the Turks, who had yielded to the climatic influences of an island ever warmed by the gentle zephyrs. Either race nourished but the one wish for peace. The memories of childhood cherished by men brought np in the same huts, nourished often by the same milk, labourers with common interests, or shepherds like Abel, had triumplied over fanaticism. The church and the mosque bore with one another, and no ill would have befallen t he island, had not the Forte, true to its plan of oppression, determined to rule with a rod of iron any land whieh held Christians.

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