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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 479

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GERVINUS. We translate another biief account of the same events from the litititrrectiou et Rëyëttèrntion de Ut (ìrèoe, by G. G. Gervinus, Professor at Heidelberg. Traduction Française, θνο, Paris, 1863. Vol. ι. 282, 3. At the same time as, or a little after, the massacre at Smyrna, the large islands of Cyprus and Crete were visited with the same troubles. Situated at a distance from the theatre of the insurrection, with scarcely any knowledge of the Hetairia, without arms and without hope of help from their neighbours, the Christians of both islands had no more passionate wish than to keep out of reach of the meddling of their fellows, and the molestation of their masters. The Cretan priests exhorted their Hocks in all sincerity not to mix themselves up with the disastrous enterprises of the insurgents. But in neither island could submission avail to avert misfortune. At the beginning of the revolution the Porte had sent over some troops to Cyprus, giving the Mitteselim full power to deal with the leading Christians as he might think necessary in the interests of the public safety. The aghas, to whom these orders had been coinniunicated in a secret meeting, presented a list of persons for proscription, according to which the Arehbishop, the bishops and all the notables and wealthy Christians, whom they wished to sacrifice to their personal hatred or to their greed, were to be put to death. The Muteselim hesitated, but when they made him responsible for his clemency, and especially when letters and proclamations inviting the inhabitants to revolt, distributed in the island by the Archimandrite Theseus, were intercepted, he agreed to follow their advice, as soon as the reinforcements which he expected from S. Jean d'Acre and Tripoli should arrive. He then summoned all the rich Greeks to come to Levcosia, the capital of the island. Many of them came ; others, mistrusting the Governor, fled to their fellow-Christians at Lamica, where they hid themselves in the retreats offered by the consulates. Then the Muteselim threw off the mask. The Archbishop was hanged, the three bishops beheaded, and two hundred notables were condemned to death or slaveiy. This butchery—the victims were often hacked to pieces —lasted not less than thirty days. Here again the foreign consuls did excellent service, especially the French Consul Méchain, by protecting the Greeks who were pursued, and, as far as they could, securing their escape over sea. The French Admiral Halgan helped the starving fugitives, distributing among them many thousand rations of biscuits which he received from Toulon. PHILKMON. (ÎBKVlNUîJ.

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