HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
uses Google technology and indexes only and selectively internet - libraries having books with free public access
 
  Previous Next  

GIOVANNI MARITI
Travels in the Island of Cyprus
page 111

View PDF version of this page

followers fled to the fort of Cerines. A good many women also took refuge there, and they prepared for a resolute defence. This news was conveyed to him by Mr Turner, and forth-with, on July 2, the Pasha marched off his troops to Nicosia, leaving Meleky Bey, captain of the Turkish war vessel, to guard Larnaca with his men, to see that the town was quiet and orderly, and the people free from anxiety. Qarqa Oghlu, a restless and turbulent spirit, with his savage and barbarous followers, had been guilty of fresh out-rages at Salines, for which both the chief and his men had been rebuked and threatened by the Pasha. Thereon they conceived a bitter hatred towards the inhabitants of both towns, and boasted that they would sack every house in Larnaca and Salines, Greek, Turkish and European, and kill the consuls and their proteges. This was not pleasant hearing, but no fear was felt as long as the Pasha was in Larnaca. He knew the ruffianly temper of Qarqa Oghlu, and managed to send him off before daylight to Nicosia, and so get him out of places with which he chose to be enraged. Four hours after Mohammad Bey had left the town a villager brought a story that Qarqa Oghlu and his band had met him somewhere off the main road, and had threatened that when the Pasha had passed on he meant to return that very night to Larnaca to ravage the place "with fire and sword. His tale was believed, and the whole town was thrown into alarm : some were crying ; some flying, some hurriedly burying their treasures in the ground. The European merchants tried to place their books in safety, and to pack up their more valuable possessions to send them on board some vessel. The Turkish, Greek and European women looked despairingly for some hiding place : night was approaching, and with it they expected the arrival of the barbarous Caramanians. It was proposed that they should seek shelter on board ship, and they flocked in troops to the sea shore ; but here they found a difficulty, for Meleky Bey, xx] Insurrection of 1764-6 107

View PDF version of this page


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 
Our banners   Bibliography   Global Folio
All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated.
If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate Cyprus Explorer as a source and place link to us.
Created at June 2008
              Яндекс.Метрика