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GIOVANNI MARITI
Travels in the Island of Cyprus
page 153

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Venice in 1628. This paper contains various notices of the condition of the island at that date. There were only four fortresses, Paphos, Limasol, Cerines and Salines, and two cities, Nicosia and Famagusta. In each fortress were 100 horsemen and 100 foot soldiers. In Nicosia 400 horse and 400 infantry : in Famagusta 200 horse and 200 infantry. In the rest of the island there might be among Turks and renegades 8000 men, while there were 10,000 Christians ready to take up arms against their masters. The writer proposes to make a feigned attack on Paphos, Limasol and Cerines, to divide the troops in the island ; then to land in force at Salines, and to march with 6000 or 7000 infantry to Nicosia, while the naval forces attacked Famagusta by sea and land. Victory would be certain, for he remembers that when the fleet of Ferdinand I approached, although all the janissaries, cavalry and infantry, were under arms they had so great fear of defeat, that they had determined it would be wiser to surrender at the very moment when the Tuscan fleet on leaving the harbour fired its last three shots at the fortress. He notes next the artillery then in Famagusta. Five cannons only were serviceable, the rest being dismounted and without carriages. The enterprise would require 10,000 men, 20 vessels and six galleys, with other preparations and provisions on a grand scale. Arms were especially required to supply to the Christian islanders who would take their side. There was nothing extravagant in this, since Tronchi was planning the general conquest of the island. But it would have been wiser first to secure possession of Famagusta, for with the fall of this fortress the conquest of Cyprus might be deemed assured. This plan too fell to the ground ; and the jealous aims of no other Power have been directed at Cyprus, which remains in the hands of the Turks. xxvi] Sundry Notes on Cyprus 149

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