HISTORY ETHNOGRAPHY NATURE WINE-MAKING SITE MAP
Selected and rare materials, excerpts and observations from ancient, medieval and contemporary authors, travelers and researchers about Cyprus.
 
 
 
 
uses Google technology and indexes only and selectively internet - libraries having books with free public access
 
  Previous Next  

CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 123

View PDF version of this page

IWltUTA. ilo defence of that post, kept renewing .the fight with fresh soldiers, relieved the weary, kept the enemy at bay where they were most active, hurled back those who began to give way, and showed himself everywhere a wise and brave commander. The Tnrks, thus repulsed, to leave nothing untried, devised yet a new way to harass our men, whose tronbles and difficulties were already unbearable. They filled the whole space between the gate and the ravelin with firewood and fascines, and set the stuff on fire, throwing also into the midst various compounds to increase the blaze. Our soldiei* were sorely tormented with the heat, and with the stench of a certain wood grown in the island, called by the peasants tezza, which gives out α streng and most unpleasant odour. This fire lasted for many days, until the defenders, who had tried in every way to extinguish it, could hardly remain on the spot. Yet, in spite of all, these brave fellows persisted in the defence. So keen was their daring, und so determined their resolve to hold out to the end that eveu old men and women defied the natural weakness of age and sex, and kept their posts on the walls, performing all the duties of soldiers. But filings had come to such α pass that toils endured and perils braved were all in vain. The strength of the enemy outside kept increasing, new reinforcements of men and munitions came up daily, while within men, munitions and victuals were daily failing. A large number of the bravest soldiers had died at their posts; the wounded lay almost abandoned for want of doctors and drags. The few who were still-sound were worn ont by fatigue and hardship; they were eating the flesh of asses, horses, dogs, and such like nauseous food : wine and vinegar had failed entirely, and they had water only to drink, so that they were reduced to such a pitch of weakness that it s a brave spirit rather than strength of body which kept them alive. The citizens were now fully aware that the place could not possibly hold out much >uger, and resolved to beg the civil and military chiefs to provide, before the end came, for •heir safety. Matteo Golfi was their spokesman. He dwelt on the loyalty and constancy of the inhabitants, on the dangers and hardships which «o far they had borne with signal patience, and in the name uf the whole city implored the magistrates that, now that they saw the desperate state of affairs, they would not allow the total ruin of their country to be a miserable memorial to mark the loyalty irf the people uf Famagusta. Its salvation should be the reward of their deserts. To the double glory of the defenders it should be made manifest that their generous spirits, which no fear of the enemy could tame, had stooped to the love of friends, and to the wish to secure to them, not indeed the lot they could have wished, but at least all that fortune would giant. He urged that, if there were bnt α gleam of hope, the readiness nnd bravery which had been shown hitherto wonld not even yet fail. If they could with their blood ransom their fatherland from the heavy and cruel yoke of these barbarian unbelievers, and preserve it under the just and mild government of Venice, not α man would shrink. What inspired their request was certainly not the fear of death, a matter lightly esteemed of men who had lost so many relations and friends, all indeed that was dear to them, and to whom life could no longer offer any pleasure: rather was it the anxious prescience thnt they might remain alive to see still heavier and longer troubles, their country enslaved, themselves and their children in bonds, and their everlasting salvation imperilled. They asked them in all humility, in all affection, in the name of their must loyal city, that the authorities wonld consent to treat with the enemy, a course the Turks themselves were datily proposing, and under honourable conditions endeavour to preserve what might yet perhaps be left of so great and noble a kingdom. Having heard the prayer of the people, the magistrates and principal commanders 1Κ 4

View PDF version of this page


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 
Our banners   Bibliography   Global Folio
All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated.
If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate Cyprus Explorer as a source and place link to us.
Created at June 2008
              Яндекс.Метрика