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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 261

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HEYMAN. POCOCKE. 251 complaint, and another to justify itself; but by the prudence of the English ambassador they were reconciled. When the Muselliin comes to Lernica for taking a view of the stato of the town, which is once a year, all his expenses, and that of his retinue, are defrayed by the Greeks, which amount to betwixt three or fonr hundred piasters; and whilst the English were building their vast house, which gave such umbrage, the Mnsellim came four times to Lernica, without the least abatement to the Greeks, several of whom were reduced extremely low by this additional expense. Having seen everything remarkable in the island, we provided ourselves with letters of recommendation, and agreed with a master of an English vessel, bound for Joppa ; who among other passengers, had twenty Greek pilgrims, and the bishop of Gerines, all going to Jerusalem. POCOCKE. Richard Pococke, LL J>., F.R.S., left Tripoli for Cyprus on October 24,1788, and anchored at Limassol, on October 28. He left the island, Bailing from Limata»], on December 25,1738. His Description of the East aad some other Countries was published in two volumes folio, London, 1743—46, and translated into German, 1771—73, and French, 1772, He gives a map of Cyprus, plans of Citium and Salamis, and a plate of Phoenician inscriptions discovered in the foundations of ancient Citinm. These we are obliged to omit, as well as the references to them in the text. Our transcription, which preserves throughout the authors spelling, is from pp. 209—235 of volume u. Part i. With Pococke's estimate of the natives cf. Dietrich von Niem (1840—1418), In Nemore Unionist Tract, vi. Cap. 32 (apud Menrsinm),"In Cypro,in qua fastus Galliens, Syra moUities, Graecae blauditiae, oc fraudes: quae unoin videlicet in ìusnlom convenere." On the twenty fourth of October, 1738, about ten of the clock, we set sail from Tripoli for Cyprus, on board an English ship which was obliged to touch at Jktyreut in the way. On the twenty fifth we had little mud all day, and only came np with a small bay called Cabouch, about twenty miles to the north of Tripoli. On the twenty sixth we camo up with Esbeie, and sailed close along the shoar under the Castrava η mountains ; I saw almost all the places we had visited on those hills, and in the evening we arrived m the road of Bayreut, where the super cargo went ashoar; and on his return, we immediately set sail again. On the twenty eighth we came up with Cyprus, anchored in the evening in the road of Limesol ; and on the twenty ninth went ashoar at that town. BOOK THE THIRD. OF THE ISLAND OF CYPRUS. Chap. I. OF CYPRUS IM GENERAL, OF LIMASSOL, AMATHUS, LARNACA, AND THE ANCIENT CITI DU. The north part of the island of Cyprus is fifty miles from the Cilician shoar, which agrees with the account of the an tien ts, who making a computation by measuring round the bays of the island, say that it is about four hundred twenty eight miles in circumference; bnt those who computed, probably by travelling round the island by land, make it only three hundred seventy five miles. Some say, that it was a hundred and seventy five miles long, others two • ΙΟ Ο

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