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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 262

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hundred ; but the modern sea-carts make it only one hundred and thirty fire in length, aud sixty two miles broad in the widest part. Cyprus was antiently divided into many Kingdoms, and was conquered successively by the Egyptians, Phoenicians, Cyrus King of Persia, and Alexander the great ; it fell to the lot of the successors to the Kings of ./Egypt, afterwards was subdued by the Romans, became subject to the Greek Emperors, and, whilst it was under them, was laid waste by the Arabs. In one thousand, one hundred ninety one, Richard the first, King of England, conquered it, and gave it to Guy Lusignan, King of Jerusalem ; and his family continued to govern it until the year fourteen hnndred twenty three, when it was taken by a Sultan of ./Egypt, who permitted their own King to reign over them, on his paying hiin a certain tribute. Iu one thousand four hnndred seventy three, one of the Kings left this island to the Repnblick of Venice, who enjoyed it, paying the tribute to JEgypt, until it was taken from them in one thousand five hundred and seventy tinder Sultan Selim, and it has ever since remained in subjection to the Ottoman port. There are two chains of mountains that run along the island, one of which begins at the eastern point of it, and extends about three quarters of the length of the Island, to the bay which is west of Germes. The other chain of mountains begins at Cape Pyla, which is to the east of Lernica, and stretches away to the north west corner of the island. Pliiry mentions fifteen cities in this island, and probably in antient times there were as many Kingdoms; but at the time of Alexander it was under nine Kings, aud it is not difficult to discover what cities with their territories, composed these Kingdoms, as I shall have occasion to observe in the journey which I made round the island. Limeso], where we landed, is a small town, built of uiibnrnt brick ; there are a great number of mulberry gardens abont it, with houses in them, which makes the place appear veiy beautiful at a distance ; the country also abounds in vineyards and the rich Cyprus wine is made only about this place ; the ordinary wine of the country being exceedingly bad. It is one of the cheapest places in the island, which is the reason why ships bound to ./Egypt, and other parts put iu here to victual. I was told that α small heifer sells sometimes for two dollars, or five shillings: they have built a castle and platform here, to defend themselves against the Maltese. The Greeks have two churches one of which is α very handsome new built fabric. "We were entertained in a house of the English Viccconsul who was α Greek, and on the same day that we lauded we hired mules, and set out to the east. We travelled through a narrow plain on the sea side and going about two miles came to the river Char where they keep a guani against the corsairs. When rivera are mentimied iu Cyprus, they mnst be understood only as beds of winter torrents; for 1 could find but one in all the island that has always water in it. At the end of the plain there are ruins of a low hill, which are called old Limesol ; it is about two leagues from the town. This is generally agreed to he Amathus, which is said to have had its name from Amathus, who bnilt a temple here to Venus called on this account, Venus Amathusia ; it is said to have been sacred both to Venns and Adonis. This was probably the capital of one of the nine Kingdoms of Cyprus. It iu said, that Richard the first of England, being hindered by the inhabitants from taking in water on the island when he was going to the holy war, came to this place on his return, aud took Isaac, King of Cyprus, prisoner, and sent him in silver chains to Tripoli in Syria. There are remains of the walls, which are fifteen feet thick, and cased with hewn stone. On the west side there is a building like an old castle, probably on the site of the antient city, which might extend to the east as far as that part, where there are great heaps of ruins. 252 EXCERPTA CYPRIA.

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