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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 263

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and among them a handsome ruinous church which may be on the spot where the temple was built to Venus and Adonis, in which the Feasts uf the latter were annually celebrated. There seems also to have been a suburb tu the east extending to the river Antigonia. Abont seven leagues to the east north east of this place, is a mountain called by the Greeks Oros Staverns, and by Europeans Monte Croce, it was called by the antients Mount Olympus, aud was compared by them to the human breast; it has the Greek name from a convent on the top of it, dedicated to the holy cross. We went about an hour and a half further,- and lay at a christian village called Menie. On the thirtieth we crossed the hills that make the point which is to the east of Limesol, and having travelled some time we came to Cape Malzoio; to the west of it there is a narrow vale, which is a inorassy ground; there are many trees and very high reeds growing in it, and I saw some ruins here. Soon after we passed about half a mile to the South of the village Malnoto, which is computed to be nine hours from Limesol, and is directly South of the summit of Mount Croce. Palfea which is mentioned as between Amathus and Citium, might be about this place. We came in an bolli-to the river Bouzy, where there was a small stream, and in about an hour more to cape Chedc; there are several hamlets about it that go by that name. A rivulet rises out of Mount Croce, which is called Greiz Simeone, aud falls into the sea near this head; it is probably the river Tetius, mentioned betweeu Citiuin and Amathus. I saw tu the north a village called Der Stéphane; in about au hour we came to a large village called Bromlaha, and in half an hour passed over the bed of a torrent, and came to the large lakes, from which they collect every year great quantities of salt ; they are filled by rain water, and the soil being full of nitre, produces the salt, when the water is evaporated in summer; but in case there is too much water, occasioned by extraordinary rains, it is not salt enough to harden into cakes, and for this reason the Venetians had drains to carry off the water, which are now neglected. To the west of these lakes there is a small Turkish convent, in which there is only one Dervish ; they have a sepulchre there, which is held iu great veneration by the Mahometans, it being, as they say, the place where the foster sister of Fatimah, the sister of Mahomet was buried : These salt lakes extend almost to Lamica, and make it the most unhealthy place in the island. When we arrived at Lamica, where the Franks reside, I went to the house of the English Consul, to whom 1 was recommended. Lamica is situated a small mile from the sea : At the port which belongs to it there is a little town called the Marine; the harbour is naturally well sheltered, but the ships he off at some distanoe, aud the boats come ashoar on an open beach, and are drawn up to land. Tho' this place is very unhealthy, yet the Franks are settled here, as it is very convenient on account of its situation with regard to Nicosia, where the government resides, it being only six leagues from it. There is a large an tient church at the port, dedicated to Saint Lazarus, where they shew his sepulchre; it is a small grot cut out of the rock; they say, that this saint being put into a boat at- Joppa, and committed to the mercy of the sea, he was drove to this place, and became bishop of it, and that his body was stolen away by the Frenclt aud carried to Marseilles; but the French say, that he was drove on their coasts. The ruins of the anticnt city of Kitium are between the town of Lamica and the Marine, which was a capital of a second Kingdom in Cyprns. It was famous for the birth of the great philosopher Zeno, and for the death of the renowned Athenian geueial Ci mon, who expired at the siege of it. Ptolemy the son of Lag us, destroyed this city, and removed its inhabitants to new Paphos; it was about three miles in circumference. There is reason to think that in very antient times the sea washed the south walls of it, though it is now a quarter of a mile distant. To the east of the old POCOOKE. 253

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