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CLAUDE DELAVAL COBHAM
Exerpta Cypria
page 339

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prescribed for hin complaint, be offered us his finnan; and ordered his dragoman to prepare a magnificent dinner. Δ Grazelle, a species of Capra called by the Greeks άγριη, was brought to me for my painter to take a drawing of. I was assured it was an inhabitant of Mount Troas; though this animal had been sent to the Governor as a present from the coast of Syria. There was nothing in the palace which indicated the magnificence and dignity of the Governor of so large and rich an island; but unfortunately for Cyprus, it is the appanage of .the Grand Vazir, who obliges the Governor by measures the most oppressive to remit an annual revenue much exceeding the force and strength of its inhabitants under the present distressing circumstances. The poor Greeks pay a Kharaj of forty or fifty piastres, and annual emigrations of large numbers are the consequence of this oppressive despotism. The Greeks have, at first perhaps from necessity, been indnced to practise some low tricks of lying and knavery ; and from frequent repetition these may at length have become habitual among many of them. One of onr guides had secretly made an agreement with a Turk that two of our horses should cany his com to Larnaka; tempted to this dishonest proceeding with hopes of gaining a few paras. Had I mentioned the circumstance to the Governor, the poor fellow would have lost his head; I hinted it only tu the dragoman, who immediately sent an officer to inform him, ho should answer for his condnct in the most exemplary manner, in case of any fnrther complaint from ns. The fellow frightened became, from the most obstinate, the most docile creature iu the world on our journey to Mount Treas. Our dinner was served after the Turkish fashion; a great variety of dishes well dressed, gave us a favourable idea of the Turkish cooking, and the Governor's hospitality. I had counted thirty-six, when the dragoman made us an apology for the badness of the dinner; and that he had not assistance enough to prepare it. The Governor expressed an anxious wish that I should see the medicine prepared, which I had prescribed for hiin, expressing a great want of confidence in his physician at Larnaca. Upon iny making my premise to hiin, and wishing that it might relieve him, all the persons in waiting exclaimed In-slia-Allah (If God will, 'Ear ό Κ Jpioç ΘΛήσν, S. James, iv. 15). It was late when we left Nicosia, and after eight hours we arrived at our lodgings at the Salines. April 27. We set out on an excursion to Mount Troas. Leaving the Salines of Lamaka, we passed through a vale in which were some ruins at a place called Cetti ; being alarmed at the appearance of a thunder storm we stopped at η small village, Magado, to dine, four hours from Larnaka. In our way to Menni, I observed the Linum uodifloruin, and shot a beautiful species of Fringilla with a yellow breast aud a black head, called by the Greeks σκάρθαλιτ. This bird sings delightfully, rivalling the nightingale in its note; we observed it frequently in the evening perched on the top of some bnsh or tree. April 28. We left Mouni eleven hours from Lamaka, and after four hours' ride arrived at Limeso]. On the road we passed the ruins of the ancient Amathns; I observed the Seabiusa syriaca growing among the corn, and on the sea-sand a species of Anchusa. Limesol is an inconsiderable town, frequented only on account of its com, and the neighbourhood to the vineyards of La Commanderia. The bay is deeper than that of Larnaka, and ships approach nearer the shore to take in their lading. Our vice-consul, a Greek, treated us handsomely; and uncommon for a Greek, lodged ns in his house without making a bill. At Nicosia, the Danish dragoman brought in a most shameful charge for a supper, to which he himself had invited us. We héro fornici our companion Mr Hawkins, who had been to Soulea and the Panagia of Cicci. April 20. At seven we left Limesol ; having travelled two hours in a plain, we passed SIBTHORP. 329

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